The impact of our work

By providing a daily meal in a place of learning, we meet the immediate needs of hungry children and encourage them to go to school to gain an education that can, in the future, be their ladder out of poverty.

Our programmes work to bring about the following positive changes in the lives of children and their communities:

Short-term changes

  • Reduced hunger.
  • Increased school enrolment.
  • Improved attendance, concentration and learning.
  • Increased progression between grades.
  • Improved health and wellbeing.

Long-term changes

  • Encouraging community support for education.
  • Support for smallholder farmers.
  • Increasing government recognition of school feeding.

Our monitoring and evaluation strategy is based around these key changes and is available to download.

Complex research

Mary’s Meals is currently conducting five-year quasi-experimental impact assessment research projects in Malawi, Zambia and Liberia to examine and evidence the impact that Mary’s Meals’ school feeding programme is having on the lives of vulnerable children and their communities.

This work is designed, project-managed and delivered by Mary’s Meals and is being independently assessed, evaluated and verified throughout by the International NGO Training and Research Centre (INTRAC). INTRAC’s scrutiny is essential in ensuring that our work is objective and credible.

The studies assess the impact of Mary’s Meals’ programmes against groups of schools where we are not currently feeding but plan to be able to work in future, through surveys and focus groups with children, teachers, volunteers and families.
 
The results from our research among a sample of schools in Malawi demonstrate that Mary’s Meals’ school feeding programme is making a significant impact to reduce levels of child hunger at school and to increase access, participation and progression within primary education. Some of the key findings are:

•    Reduced hunger among children at school.  Many children, teachers and volunteers observed the positive physical effects that the school feeding programme is making. For example, the percentage of children saying they feel hungry at school at least ‘sometimes’ decreased from 87% to 13%. The percentage of teachers saying ‘children in my class never complain of hunger’ increased from 7% to 87%.

•    Improved school attendance and the elimination of absences attributed to hunger. Our research found a marked reduction in the numbers of children leaving school early during the school day. Most importantly, the incidences of this linked to hunger disappeared completely (decreasing from 29% to 0). 98% of teachers said that children pay more attention in class since Mary’s Meals started feeding at their school. 

•    Reduced levels of children dropping out of school. Teachers reported a reduction in the number of children dropping out of school due to hunger and observed that progression and completion rates had improved. 99% of children said they find it easier to learn at school. 

•    Increased feelings of happiness at school and decreased levels of anxiety due to hunger. The percentage of children saying ‘I feel happy at school’ increased from 60% to 81%, and 97% of children said having Mary’s Meals’ porridge at school had made a positive difference to their lives. The percentage of children saying they worry about being hungry at school at least ‘sometimes’ decreased from 61% to 7%.

Ultimately the report demonstrates that as well as attracting children in to the classroom and improving enrolment and attendance, school feeding has the power to reduce classroom hunger, improve concentration and participation in class, as well as affecting children’s overall happiness and hunger-related anxiety, acting as a key investment in a country’s future and a cost-effective route out of poverty for the long-term.

Findings at a glance

Improved attendance. Decreased absence due to hunger. Decreased incidence of children leaving school early during the school day (incidences of this linked to hunger disappeared completely).Increased concentration at school, improved attention levels in class, greater participation in lessons, improved ability to learn and increased attainment – as reported by children and teachers

Mary's Meals Aim

Impact

Reduced hunger for children living in poverty who attend schoolReduction in hunger at school and resulting physical effects reported by children, teachers and volunteers.
Increased access to primary education for children living in povertyIncreased enrolment. Decreased numbers of children out of school in local community. Initial increase in class sizes.
Improved engagement in primary education of children living in povertyImproved attendance. Decreased absence due to hunger. Decreased incidence of children leaving school early during the school day (incidences of this linked to hunger disappeared completely). Increased concentration at school, improved attention levels in class, greater participation in lessons, improved ability to learn and increased attainment – as reported by children and teachers
Increased progression within primary education by children living in povertyDecreased drop-out and drop-out due to hunger. Increased progression and completion reported by teachers.
Improved health and well-being of children living in povertyIncreased feelings of happiness at school and decreased levels of anxiety due to hunger. Reduced incidences of children missing school to work.
Increased support for education within vulnerable communitiesIncreased level of parental involvement in school activities, leading to increased community support for education

A teacher’s view

In Malawi, we are reaching 30% of the country’s entire primary school population. Irene Kaferapanjira has been teaching at Blantyre Girls Primary School in Malawi since we began feeding there in 2008.

She remembers what it was like to teach before children received Mary’s Meals:

“Learners weren’t coming in to school and when they did come to school they weren’t concentrating in class. They were always so hungry and that made teaching them difficult.

“Now it is the opposite. Because of this programme, more learners are coming to school, staying in school and improving their grades. If Mary’s Meals were to stop feeding, there would be lots of absenteeism.”

We remain committed to delivering our school feeding programmes to some of the world’s hungriest children who are in most need, using our unique approach which is simple, but never simplistic.

What people tell us about Mary’s Meals

Open quote mark Before Mary’s Meals the children had nothing to eat all day at school. They were always tired and had no energy or enthusiasm. Now they are very participative indeed and their stomachs are full! Close quote mark
Head teacher Moses Nderema, Kagolo Primary School, Malawi.

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